"Can't Stop Won't Stop" Opening at the California African American Museum

This past week I had the chance to check out the California African American Museum. The museum hosted "Can't Stop, Won't Stop," a free party to celebrate the opening of three new exhibits. The opening event included food trucks, two DJs and the opportunity to check out the exhibits. 

 
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I didn't get a chance to check out any of the food trucks; the lines were too long. But I did enjoy viewing the new exhibits, the sounds of two DJs and mingling. Of course the fashion pieces caught my eye long with colorful artwork.  I look forward to going back when it's less crowded to really take in the exhibits. 

 
"Fashion designer Jae Jarrell made one-of-a-kind clothing using bright hues the collective [AfriCOBRA]ย called "Coolade" colors, a wordplay on a popular children's beverage."

"Fashion designer Jae Jarrell made one-of-a-kind clothing using bright hues the collective [AfriCOBRA] called "Coolade" colors, a wordplay on a popular children's beverage."

 
 
by Jae Jarrell

by Jae Jarrell

 
 
"Dressed in an elaborate costume made of 180 pairs of white gloves and carry a cat-o-nine-tails whip made from sail rope studded with white chrysanthemums, [Lorraine] O'Grady made uninvited appearances at openings at the New Museum of Contemporary Art and Just Above Midtown Gallery as the farcical and indicting persona Miss Black Middle-Class 1955, demanding attention for black women artists."

"Dressed in an elaborate costume made of 180 pairs of white gloves and carry a cat-o-nine-tails whip made from sail rope studded with white chrysanthemums, [Lorraine] O'Grady made uninvited appearances at openings at the New Museum of Contemporary Art and Just Above Midtown Gallery as the farcical and indicting persona Miss Black Middle-Class 1955, demanding attention for black women artists."

 
 
By Lorna Simpson "In this work, the waterbearer disrupts her task, pouring water with abandon. The paired text describes how women's stories are often undermined and ignored."

By Lorna Simpson

"In this work, the waterbearer disrupts her task, pouring water with abandon. The paired text describes how women's stories are often undermined and ignored."

 
 
This painting by Charlisle Chang was one of my favorite. "The Inherent Nobility of Man."

This painting by Charlisle Chang was one of my favorite. "The Inherent Nobility of Man."

 
 
By Lezley Saar. Part of the Gender Renaissance series.

By Lezley Saar. Part of the Gender Renaissance series.

 

To learn more about the California African American Museum, visit https://caamuseum.org/. Admission to the museum is free!